Filmed in Jamaica, Roaring Lion charts the growth and development of the Rastafarian Movement and its founder, the former Garveyite Leonard Howell.  With interviews from the renowned academic and Rasta scholar Professor Barry Chevannes and several of the movement’s leading figures, Mortimmo Plano, Fimore Alvaranga, Dago and Gertrude Campbell, the documentary charts the Movement’s growth from a persecuted commune in the foothills of Pinnacle, Jamaica, to an internationally recognized religion.

Roaring Lion is the first documentary officially endorsed by leading elders of the Rastafarian Movement.

 
 

A social investigation into the disproportionate levels of violence and murder suffered by the black community of Britain, this documentary identifies the failure of the British educational system, the breakdown of family, and consumerism/capitalism as significant contributing factors towards these phenomena. With interviews from gunmen, underground arms dealers, drug users and victims of the violence, the film attempts to define the social environment which conditions and nurtures the desire to consume and destroy.

Filmed over six months, Bang Bang In Da Manor has been described as the most graphic and disturbing documentary ever made in Britain.

 
 

In the largest survey of youth gangs ever undertaken in the UK, Dispatches discovers that the vast majority of youth gangs are committing and suffering horrific levels of violence.

The most alarming revelation is that all the gangs operate under the same code of silence as their adult criminal counterparts. The law of the streets dictates that no one talks to the police.

 
 

A powerful exposé of Australia's hidden apartheid.

Delving beyond Australia’s reputation of sun, surf and sand to reveal a nation ruptured by a deep racial divide and contested history. Taking the controversial 2007 Northern Territory Intervention as its starting point, This is Our Country Too is a hard-hitting investigation into Australia's woeful treatment of its indigenous peoples, and a rare depiction of their unrelenting struggle for justice, equality and self-determination.

In June 2007, the Australian government took the unprecedented step of suspending its Race Relations Act to introduce the Intervention - a series of draconian, federal-backed laws designed to control the flow of alcohol and pornography into 'prescribed communities' in the Northern Territory. It was a reactionary response to endemic alcoholism and supposedly endemic child abuse in these communities, though there is little data to support the latter accusation.

Featuring interviews with prominent Aboriginal leaders, Pat Turner, niece of 'Australia'a Mandela,' Charlie Perkins, Pat Dodson, spearhead of the reconciliation movement, actor/artist David Gulpilil and Jenny Macklin, Minister of Indigenous Affairs, This is Our Country Too puts the world's focus on Australia’s indigenous people’s forgotten plight and advances the question: How will Australia reconcile with it's indigenous people?

Founded in 1999, riceNpeas is an independent film production company that specialises in social documentaries, guerilla journalism and thought-provoking film. Their photo-journalists and film-makers aim to question, challenge and educate.

 
 

In an era where Islam has become synonymous with terrorism, Age of Extremes is an insightful and timely documentary that challenges the British Establishment's representation of Islam and the threat to Britain from Islamic Extremism.

 
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Cuba embraced tourism in the early 90's as a means of surviving the collapse of the Soviet Union. As a result, the Island has begun to witness many changes which now threaten the integrity of the revolution: racial discrimination, prostitution, consumerism, and the re-emergence of class divisions.

Hasta Siempre takes the viewer on a journey through the lives of ordinary Cubans, examining the results of the Cuban revolution from the perspective of the Cuban people, and asks the question: Can the revolution survive after the death of Fidel Castro?

 
 

Sierra Leone recently emerged from a 12-year civil war which claimed the lives of thousands and was hallmarked by arbitrary amputations of civilians. Although peace has now come to the country, many of the root causes to the conflict still remain: poverty, corruption, poor sanitation and bad governance. Ishmahil Blagrove, Jr. speaks to the key players in Sierra Leone's future and questions whether or not this peace can really last.

The documentary is a graphic view of Sierra Leone from the inside. It destroys the Western notion of "Blood Diamonds" and exposes how the mineral wealth of this poor West African country is being exploited by foreigners and corrupt politicians.

 
 

Blood Diamonds takes the viewer on a journey from amputee camps to the Rebel RUF stronghold in Kono, where Ishmahil Blagrove, the first journalist allowed to visit and film the region, exposes how the rebels organise their mining operations and smuggle the diamonds into government-held territories for international export.

With interviews from Government Ministers and Rebel Leaders, this documentary exposes the rampant destruction of civilian life and unravels a complex web of corruption and international hypocrisy.

 
 

With Or Without Fidel is a ground-breaking documentary that features Cuba’s leading politicians, intellectuals and dissidents, who debate the future direction of the Island’s 48 year-old revolution.

How do Cubans feel about their own identity and freedom of speech? For the first time, the people of Cuba question the values that western democracy holds sacred and the price Cubans have paid for their independence.

With Or Without Fidel is an extremely rare glimpse into the heart of Cuban society. While the BBC, CNN and other correspondents were expelled from the country, Rice N Peas Films was given unprecedented access to produce an honest portrayal of the Island.

Filmed during the most precarious period in Cuba’s history, With or Without Fidel reveals the aspirations and vulnerabilities of a country on the brink of change.

 
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Sierra Leone recently emerged from a 12-year civil war which claimed the lives of thousands and was hallmarked by arbitrary amputations of civilians. Although peace has now come to the country, many of the root causes to the conflict still remain: poverty, corruption, poor sanitation and bad governance. Ishmahil Blagrove, Jr. speaks to the key players in Sierra Leone's future and questions whether or not this peace can really last.

The documentary is a graphic view of Sierra Leone from the inside. It destroys the Western notion of "Blood Diamonds" and exposes how the mineral wealth of this poor West African country is being exploited by foreigners and corrupt politicians.

 
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